Posts Tagged ‘Self publishing’

vellum-1200-icon.jpgI just used Vellum for the first time to prepare files to upload on KDP, Amazon’s e-book platform. I’ve dragged my feet on doing this for over a year. Instead I’ve resorted to my past, lazy use of uploading Word files.

Author Christiana Miller mentioned Vellum to me last year. “It’s easy,” she said. “Even for people who aren’t Tech geeks. It’s intuitive. It allows you to add flair and fanciness to an otherwise plain looking manscript.” I’m paraphrasing.

But like a lot of people, and a lot of writers, I was intimidated by the process. It would be hard, I thought.  I’d become overwhelmed and do something wrong and it would look lousy. And anyway, uploading from a Word doc was fine so why mess with it?

Well, one reason is a table of contents. I released a short story collection last month and there isn’t a table contents. In the print version I have one, because Shadowridge Press is good with print layout. But not in my digital version that I’m responsible for.

Today finally, when I’d put off  uploading my Word doc long enough for The Rainbox, I decided to give Vellum a shot. OMG, it’s AWESOME!!!!! Why did I wait so long?

This is how I felt when I finally started eating avocados, or using floss picks, or doing Yoga.

Screen Shot 2017-04-02 at 2.37.07 PM.pngFor one thing, it’s free until you actually need to upload your book to Kindle or any of the other platforms. For another, you can VERY EASILY do neat things like restyle your section breaks instead of using the manual ***  I had before. You can select to have the first letter in each chapter be a big pretty CAPITAL letter…And there’s a table of contents, and it puts everything where it’s supposed to go. And organizes things like Acknowledgements. You can use their headings or make your own.

I am not a Tech person but it was a breeze. The only issue I had when I dragged and dropped my Word doc into the program (that was easy) was that there were about 50 chapters. In real life there are 9. I quickly figured out how to merge chapters (highlighted the ones I needed with CTRL+Shift and clicked “merge chapters.”) Then I read through and added in the section breaks which the program had mistaken for chapter breaks.

Scrolling through and viewing the document in the program allowed me to see a couple of typos I had missed before as well. This made me very happy.

imagesTo purchase the document which gives you five different file types for different platforms that you can edit anytime, forever, is just $29.99. If you pay $99.99 you can do 10 books. Unlimited is $199.99. I don’t have that many books so I opted for the bundle of 10.

I highly recommend this software for anyone who wants a better looking e-book and wants to have fun setting it up. Currently this is only available on Mac computers, not PCs.

Soon I’ll be updating all my books on Kindle with my snazzy new software!

-Tracy

To see more of Tracy’s thoughts on writing, life, cooking, and home repairs, please visit her WEBSITE HERE. Also, please visit and follow her on Amazon for updates on upcoming titles and author appearances.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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thZSAGOAMLThe thing about being a writer who also has a full-time job, is that there’s not much time left for blog posts. Sadly there’s also little time for marketing or advertising or schmoozing.

I’ve lived in CA for almost two and half years. Since then my day job workload has really picked up, and we bought the house we were renting. Buying a house isn’t an excuse for not writing but renovating it is. And we’ve done a lot of renovating. But even with that, I have been writing fiction. Just not blog posts.

thCA4H4Y303I finished The Rainbox, a novel, February of 2016. I sent it to several agents. Some I got rejections from, and on some their sites explained that they’re too busy to reply unless they want to see more. I  understand this attitude but they should also understand that writers are ultrasensitive people who read into everything. I had one hold out agent who said they DO reply so when she didn’t after four months I dropped her a line. She apologized and said at that particular time she had a problem with the submissions page and could I resend the first 50 pages? I was miffed but resent. Three months later I got a form rejection. I think it’s fair to say I’m burnt out on the big agents and big publishers.

Most, if not all, of my contacts are in the horror genre. The new book, and most of what I write these days isn’t horror, so I’m relegated to cold calling agencies I find online. I haven’t been doing that  because back to my old point, I have limited time and can’t spend it writing dozens of queries and then waiting upwards of nine months before I try someone else.

I have decided it’s time to proposition Shadowridge Press, my favorite small press who is growing by leaps and bounds and adding many authors I greatly admire. More on that in another post.14517610_1199533770103643_5076798070215318949_n

In July, Cemetery Riots came out. This is an anthology I edited with T.C. Bennett. This is a fantastic collection of stories by talented authors. It features my story, “Lunch at Mom’s” which was accepted before I came on board.

Last month I finished a new screenplay called Pretty When She Cries which to me is a cross of Precious, Babel, and Requiem for a Dream. A dark story about people with darkness, and how their actions spiral out of control.

I’ve written several new short stories this year. One was bought by a pro market, only to have the market suddenly fold right before it was to be published. Another was sent many, many months ago to what seems to be a great market. But it’s all still in limbo and the editor isn’t giving updates. I have included both of those stories in my new collection, Just Stories. This will be out by the Vintage Paperback show in March 2017 in Glendale and features many new stories.

Big markets and big agents and big publishers have worn me out. If you can land them, great! But for the rest of us the important thing is to keep writing and not let anyone tell you that if you haven’t published with X you’re not a writer. Someone told me a few months ago that if you don’t write every day you’re not a writer. I argued that sometimes real life prevents that and being a writer-to me at least-is an inborn gift, or curse. And I certainly make up for my output when I do write. He smugly stuck to his point. I agree to disagree.

I am still writing fiction all time even if I don’t post about it.  And even if I don’t write every day. I’m still a writer.

Go Patriots!